The International Six Days Enduro (ISDE) is all about finishing, no matter what it takes, even if it takes, well, cheating. When it comes to the ISDE, cheating usually means secretly swapping out a fatally broken motorcycle with healthy one. Or, replacing a non-replaceable (aka marked) part somewhere out in the woods. We've heard the stories of broken pistons magically fixing themselves on the trail, and bent frames suddenly appearing straight and true at the end of the day. But when the truth comes out afterward, everyone seems to get a good laugh, and sometimes the tricksters even get a high-five from those who got cheated on for being clever enough to have gotten away with it.

Team USA, however, got no such high-fives when we tried some hanky panky at the 1987 ISDE in Poland. Evidently, we're not good cheaters. We proved that when the U.S. Trophy team ran into a situation, or more like a pothole, that left the team having to swap out not a bike but a rider. Let's just say it didn't go well....

To read the rest of the story, click on the link below and you'll be taken directly to article in the latest digital issue of Cycle News.

http://cyclenews.coverleaf.com/cyclenews/20110802#pg53

ISDE News


Shan Moore | Contributing Editor

Moore covers all facets of off-road racing for Cycle News – from AMA Supercross and Motocross to GNCC and National Hare Scrambles events.

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