Casey Stoner is the man to beat in 2012 MotoGP. Photogrpahy By: Gold and Goose

Photography By: Gold & Goose

When four-strokes took over in 2002, the privateer WCM team entered with a racing chassis using production-engine parts. MotoGP said no: Prototypes only. Then when the class changed, aged five, from 990cc to 800, they said that was the end for the big bikes.
Never say never again.

MotoGP four-strokes turn 11 years old in 2012, and the catharsis that gave us Motos 2 and 3 has now upended both of those principles. Welcome to the Brave New World Championship (MkIII). This time round, it has two levels.

It won't make much difference at the top. We're in for more of the same, and (thanks to extra power) maybe better, with the same riders. Good thing too, plenty to spike the interest. Can anyone stop Casey Stoner doing it again? Is it Dani Pedrosa's turn at last? Is Jorge Lorenzo's Yamaha really stronger than last year's? And will Valentino Rossi and Ducati be able to mend all those broken hearts?

For the complete MotoGP preview, see this week's Cycle News by clicking on the following link:

http://cyclenews.coverleaf.com/cyclenews/20120403#pg57

Michael Scott | MotoGP Editor

Scott has been covering MotoGP since long before it was MotoGP. Remember two-strokes? Scott does. He’s also a best-selling author of biographies on the lives of legendary racers such as Wayne Rainey and Barry Sheene.

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