Husaberg will now offer a full range of enduro models for 2013  including a 250F.  Photography By:  Schedl R.

Husaberg will now offer a full range of enduro models for 2013, including a 250F.  Photography By:  Schedl R.

Husaberg is back in the business of selling four-strokes again. In 2012, the Swedish-born now KTM-owned brand offered just two models and they were both two-strokes, which seemed a bit odd. Before then, the company had built nothing but thumpers. Technically, you could still buy four-stoke 'Bergs in 2012, but they were 2011 models. But that was then and this is now.

For 2013, Husaberg will, for the first time in its history, offer a full range of models, all, once again, devoted to enduro - there are no cross-country models, no dual sport models, no street models, no Supermoto models, no motocross models, nothing but full-on, hard-core enduro machines, offered in both two- and four-stroke variety. All of the models are, as you can expect, heavily influenced by KTM but still have their own 'Berg identity; however, Husaberg's number-one distinctiveness as of late, its innovated 70-degree engine layout design of their four-stroke motors has been abandoned in favor of more conventional and less costly KTM-like engine designs. In all, five Husaberg models will be sold in the U.S.

2013 Husaberg FE 250: Husabergs first small-bore thumper.  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

2013 Husaberg FE 250: Husaberg's first "small-bore" thumper.  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

New to the line is the FE250. It's the first 250cc, and smallest, four-stroke Husaberg has ever produced. It's powered by pretty much the same DOHC motor that propels the 2012 KTM 250SX-F motocrosser. It features a six-speed transmission, electric starting and a 42mm Keihin fuel-injection system (as do all of the four-stroke 'Bergs).

2013 Husaberg FE 350: New model  sort of .  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

2013 Husaberg FE 350: New model (sort of).  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

Also new for 2013 is the FE350 four-stroke, which supersedes the previous FE390. This isn't Husaberg's first attempt building a 350, either. Husaberg, in fact, pretty much created the middleweight, high-revving, four-stroke off-road class when it produced its second-ever model, the FE350, in 1991. The DOHC motor is similar to that of the KTM 350 motor.

2013 Husaberg FE 501: The Swedish company reinvents an old friend.  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

2013 Husaberg FE 501: The Swedish company reinvents an old friend.  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

What, no 450? Yes, it's true. Husaberg abandoned its 450 and reverted back to its all-time most successful model, the FE 501, which was also Husaberg's first ever model (1989). And it gave the Swedish firm a World off-road title almost immediately. Today, it's powered by one of KTM's latest and greatest motors, the same motor that is fitted in the 2012 KTM 500 XC-W (and EXC). And it's nearly the same powerplant that's in Ryan Dungey's Championship-winning KTM 450 SX-F, the biggest difference being a longer stroke (72mm versus 63.4mm). The 501's displacement is actually 510.4cc, and this model replaces the previous 565.5cc FE570.

2013 Husaberg TE 250: The two-stroke is alive and well in off-road.   Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

2013 Husaberg TE 250: The two-stroke is alive and well in off-road.   Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

Husaberg will continue to sell its two two-strokes - the TE 250 and 300. The 300 is Graham Jarvis' weapon of choice in extreme off-road competition, and the Brit is considered to be the best in the business right now. So what does that tell you about this bike? These bikes, however, are essentially KTMs in 'Berg clothing. The two-strokes are available with or without electric starting.

2013 Husaberg TE 300: Graham Jarvis replica.  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

2013 Husaberg TE 300: Graham Jarvis replica.  Photography By: Mitterbauer H.

All of the 2013 Husaberg feature all-new bodywork, new-generation glass fiber reinforced polyamide subframes (which are said to be lighter and stronger for '13), and newly designed central double-cradle-type chromoly-steel frames. They also have new swingarms, PDS rear suspension (basically an all-new PDS shock that is also 7mm longer), 4CS WP closed-cartridge forks, airboxes and fuel tanks.

The fuel tanks are now translucent and carry more fuel for the four-stroke models. They now hold 2.5 gallons, whereas the two-stroke tanks are actually slightly smaller than before at 2.9 gallons. Less capacity was sacrificed for improved ergonomics.

The two-strokes take on some changes of their own. Triple clamp offset has been changed from 22m to 20mm, features a new V-Force 4 intake reed valves, and a new rubber-damped clutch with billet steel basket and, like all but the FE 250 four-strokes, a diaphragm spring.

Claimed dry weight (aprox.): 237 pounds for the FE 250, 239.2 pounds for the FE 350, 248 pounds for the FE 501, and 227.1 pounds for both the TE 250 and 300 two-strokes.

Husaberg has not yet announced pricing yet and we expect the bikes to be available in early September.

Photo Galleries


Cycle News Magazine

Open This Issue For Reading

Article Headlines

By Cycle News Staff

Comments